Why is Soda Bad For You?

Soda is not good for you. This probably doesn’t come as much of a news flash, as soda is one of the first foods talked about whenever the topic of eating healthier is raised. There are actually a lot of reasons as to why soda is so demonized in the health-food industry. Soda is high in sugar content, it is comprised of a trove of chemicals that are not natural at all, and it is typically high in caffeine as well. What’s more, the way soda is served means that it is more likely than not that you will have several servings, simply amplifying the number of excess calories that you are consuming without any nutritional benefit.

With all the reasons as to why soda isn’t healthy, it shouldn’t be so hard to stop consuming, right? Here’s the problem: soda tastes good. The flavorful recipes are just the right amount of sweet, with refreshing bubbles and a caffeinated kick to help you get through the day. It is also pretty much everywhere, from restaurants to gas stations to school vending machines. This means that soda is difficult to dislike, and difficult to avoid.

However, during your medical weight loss program there won’t be any room in your daily diet for soda intake. Even diet soda is linked with weight gain and provides no nutritional benefit.

It also is associated with increased risk for a handful of chronic health conditions, such as:

  • Dementia
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Stroke
  • Type-2 diabetes

Soda is also shown to increase the rate at which the brain experiences aging. These are major medical consequences that can result of regular consumption of soda—and this includes reactions to both diet and regular soda.

Rather than drinking soda, you should be using that thirst as an opportunity to drink water and stay hydrated.

Help yourself finally get over the soda habit by trying the following strategies:

  • Set a goal and write it down. Keep that goal in mind whenever you think about grabbing a soda to drink.
  • Start a healthy habit at the same time that you decide to quit drinking soda. That way you can replace the negative with a positive. Start bringing a water bottle around with you, for example, to remind yourself to drink water instead of soda.
  • Try taking baby steps rather than going cold turkey. Cut out one soda at a time until you have a goal of not drinking soda regularly any more.

Being successful with your medical weight loss program requires more than making changes to the foods you eat. You may have to make changes to your preferred beverages, too, and the best place to start is by cutting the soda habit. Try opting for refreshing alternatives like water with fruit, or sparkling water, to help you quit the habit.

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